Tagged: black fashion

THE CHANGING FACE OF STREET FASHION

I wrote a thing for Platinum Love, this be it.

The influence of music on fashion trends has always been strong, the two industries constantly intertwine, taking inspiration from each other and subsequently influencing the man on the street. Urban street fashion in particular has always been heavily influenced by music, particularly the popularisation of labels such as Louis Vuitton, Gucci and Fendi, aspirational brands easily recognised by their logos and immortalised in countless hip hop and rap lyrics.

But times are changing. Gratuitous logos are being eschewed in favour of a new dark sports-luxe minimalism. This changing face of urban street fashion has been pioneered by one of hip hops biggest success stories of the 21stcentury –  Kanye West.
 
When West released his debut album in 2004, his sartorial choices rarely got more exciting than a plain jumper and baggy jeans. A short decade later West is now as known for his avant-garde fashion choices as his music, his sell-out Watch The Throne collaboration tour with Jay Z was art directed by Riccardo Tisci, a good friend of West and creative director of one of his favourite labels, Givenchy. By choosing to wear leather kilts and crystal encrusted Margiela masks rather than adhering to the standard uniform of oversized commercial fashion labels, West is rewriting gendered fashion for the next generation of artists including A$AP Rocky, Frank Ocean and Pheophilus London, as well as black youth as a whole, and paving the way for a larger cause, a change in attitudes towards what black masculinity really means in the 21st century.

Of course, not everyone sees West’s unconventional fashion choices as pioneering. Lord Jamar, member of New York hip-hop group Brand Nubian, took particular offense to West, penning ‘Lift Up Your Skirt’, essentially blaming West for emasculating black male youth.

Another recent rising star of hip hop, A$AP Rocky, established his interest in fashion and style from the beginning of his career, which has included him walking for Hood by Air and collaborating with Raf Simons. Rocky told the April issue of Interview “fashion is just one of those things that helped me be an individual…it helped me get the attention that most people try to get with publicity stunts of by doing other crazy things.”

This evolution of black street fashion is important in terms of a new fashion moment, but also in terms of working towards quashing negative and intolerant attitudes both within the hip hop community. By popularising an aesthetic that is non-gender specific and also not as consciously hyper-consumerist, a more liberal attitude toward fashion will hopefully influence a liberal attitude in general. Hood by Air, the cult streetwear label was founded in 2006 by an openly gay black man, Shayne Oliver. The label has risen to cult status, having been worn by streetwear tastemakers including A$AP Rocky, Rihanna, Kanye West and a slew of young males on increasingly fashion forward site Tumblr. The importance of Hood by Air as the pioneer for the emergence of luxury streetwear is not to be underestimated. It’s popularity within a community constantly called out in the media for perceived promotion of intolerance proves that fashion is not a tool to divide – the haves vs the have nots, ‘gay’ vs ‘straight’, but that it is an important social agency with the power to promote positive change.

Shayne Oliver sees the popularisation of Hood by Air as “the beginning of a trend that will allow black men dress in ways formerly dismissed as ‘gay’”. Homophobia sadly is still a major issue within the hip hop musical community, and with artists such as Lord Jamar so quick to call out West, a straight man, for being ‘gay’ merely for wearing a kilt – a traditionally male item of clothing, incidentally – undermines the great leaps that artists like West who go against the mould are making towards promoting tolerance amongst black youth. A$AP Rocky said of the problem “it makes me upset that this topic even matters when it comes to hip-hop, because it makes it seem like everybody in hip-hop is small-minded or stupid — and that’s not the case. We’ve got people like Jay-Z. We’ve got people like Kanye. We’ve got people like me. We’re all prime examples of people who don’t think like that. I treat everybody equal, and so I want to be sure that my listeners and my followers do the same if they’re gonna represent me. And if I’m gonna represent them, then I also want to do it in a good way.”
 
ImageThe prestige of exclusivity previously held by Louis Vuitton et al has now moved onto the exclusivity of knowledge. Being able to not only instantly recognise a Givenchy print or a Raf Simons trainer holds weight, but also knowing where to get these items has become the new marker of fashion credibility. The new aspirational labels often run limited edition lines, placing the importance on sourcing the product and being one of the first to have it, rather than having the same item as everyone else who can afford it.

Black street fashion trends, including bandanas and low slung trousers, were traiditionally used to signify an affiliation to specific groups or gangs, this move within urban street wear towards an appreciation for the avant garde and more obvious sartorial risk taking sets wearers apart from the crowd. This emphasis on fashion as a form of self expression rather than as a uniform is paving the way for urban fashion to help bridge gaps that historically exist within hip hop and the wider community. Social freedom, long a battleground for minorities, is now finally extending to street fashion, promoting an environment where urban youth can walk down the street without fearing a backlash from their own community, and even if leather kilts are still worn by a minority, that minority includes some of the most recognisable and successful black men in the media. First, the street, second, the world.

 

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WHAT I WORE TODAY VOL.II

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I’m just a tad hungover today, so comfort is my number one priority. This look is from Damir Doma’s AW11 collection. The loose fit of the top and trousers is also aiding ventilation of my vodka sweats. I can’t wait to go home and smash seven shades out of a pizza and when I’m inevitably covered in my four cheese feast later on, the stains won’t show up quite as badly what with this outfit being all black. I’ve got it all thought out!

PLEASE MUMMY / WISHLIST / VOL II

I’m currently sat at my desk at work trying not to be sick all over myself and others. I’m convinced these are my final days. As I approach death, the light in my eyes dimming and my heart grudgingly sputtering along , here’s a load of reet nice things that would make me feel 100% better.

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From Browns

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From here

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here

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here

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Ashish

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Here

0Here

22Here

33Here

4Sadly not my desk :-(

GENDERBENDING WITH RAD HOURANI

I had a week off work, and somehow this turned into a week off from life in general, hence no posts. Anyway, the important issue here is Rad Hourani’s new unisex collection. I’m a big fan of Hourani in general, you know me, I’ve yet to meet a black androgynous look I didn’t like, but this new collection is a little bit special. The new collection, Unisex Couture, is only his ninth since launching in 2007, and features everything that is good in the world – a no-colour colour palette of black, white and grey, origami cuts and structured layering. Mmm, child. There’s a brilliant line on his website – “NO GENDER, NO SEASON, NO RULES”, which is also my attitude to my sex life. Bdum, tish.

“I STARTED IMAGINING CLOTHES THE SAME WAY I STARTED CREATING IMAGES: WITH A SENSE OF CURIOSITY AND INNOCENCE DRIVEN BY MY NO-BACKGROUND BACKGROUND. NO SCHOOL. NO TEACHERS. NO TELLY. NO BOUNDARIES. NO FORMATTING. I LIKE THE IDEA OF A WORLD THAT WE COULD LIVE AND SHAPE BY OURSELVES, ONLY BY OBSERVING. EACH OUR OWN. MY CLOTHES HAVE ERUPTED FROM THIS WORLD OF MINE. THEY ARE ASEXUAL, ASEASONAL, THEY COME FROM NO PLACE, NO TIME, NO TRADITION, YET THEY COULD BE HOME ANYWHERE, ANYTIME. THEY EXUDE A SENSE OF DISCREET CHIC, THE ESSENCE OF TIMELESS STYLE, DRAWN ON A MONOCHROMATIC AND GRAPHICAL CANVAS. PALETTE OF BLACKS AND SHADES OF TIMELESS COLORS. SOPHISTICATED UNISEX MODERN CLASSICS FOR ANTI-CONFORMIST INDIVIDUALS.” – RAD HOURANI

TWO UNISEX COLLECTIONS = ONE UNISEX CONCEPT

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PLEASE MUMMY / WISHLIST / VOL I

When I’m a broke ass bitch the only thing I can think about is why I’m being denied the means to buy pretty things. Here’s my current list of demands.

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ASOS bomber jacket, the high street version of the Acne one I’m lusting after.

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As much as his first men’s collection under Saint Laurent Paris wound me up, I still really appreciate Hedi as a photographer. Available from LN-CC.

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This is probably as summery as I’ll get, tbh. Available at Topshop

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Givenchy boots, on sale!

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Airtex is summery, right? From The Ragged Priest

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Givenchy Black Dahlia Noir.

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I know, I know, another day, another dungaree. This pleather bad boy is from Miss Selfridge.

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KFC Boneless Banquet. Don’t judge me.

AW13 / NYFW / ROUND-UP

With London Fashion Week starting today, let’s take a look back at the best that New York had to offer. By the looks of  things, we’re all in for a right old miserable time this winter.

With the first look at AW13, New York brought contrasting textures and materials, sharp lines, geometric shapes, quilting, panelling and an abundance of leather for both menswear and womenswear. And if you’re in the market for a bomber jacket next season, you’re spoilt for choice.

Womenswear tailoring was oversized and masculine, breaking up a palette of black and greys, with flashes of cobalt blue and bright purples. Make up was natural and understated with hair worn down and centre parted. For the boys, the look was slick side partings and short fringes. The message wasn’t so much ‘girls will be boys’, but rather, girls will be MEN. Masculine shapes for upper wear teamed with sharp leather skirts and thigh-high boots put the girls firmly in defense mode, with the boys swathed in impenetrable bomber jackets, kilts, shorts and leggings and lace-up boots. If New York is anything to go by, next season your clothes will also be your armour.

3.1 Phillip Lim

3.1 Phillip Lim

3.1 Phillip Lim

3.1 Phillip Lim

3.1 Phillip Lim

3.1 Phillip Lim

Creatures of the Wind

Creatures of the Wind

Creatures of the Wind

Creatures of the Wind

Creatures of the Wind

Creatures of the Wind

Diesel Black Gold

Diesel Black Gold

Diesel Black Gold

Diesel Black Gold

Diesel Black Gold

Diesel Black Gold

DKNY

DKNY

DKNY

DKNY

DKNY

DKNY

Duckie Brown

Duckie Brown

Duckie Brown

Duckie Brown

Duckie Brown

Duckie Brown

Helmut Lang

Helmut Lang

Helmut Lang

Helmut Lang

Helmut Lang

Helmut Lang

J Brand

J Brand

J Brand

J Brand

J Brand

J Brand

Lacoste

Lacoste

Lacoste

Lacoste

Lacoste

Lacoste

Louise Goldin

Louise Goldin

Louise Goldin

Louise Goldin

Louise Goldin

Louise Goldin

Rag and Bone

Rag and Bone

Rag and Bone

Rag and Bone

Rag and Bone

Rag and Bone

Rebecca Taylor

Rebecca Taylor

Rebecca Taylor

Rebecca Taylor

Rebecca Taylor

Rebecca Taylor

Sall Lapointe

Sally Lapointe

Sally Lapointe

Sally Lapointe

Sally Lapointe

Sally Lapointe

Suno

Suno

Suno

Suno

Suno

Suno

Thakoon Addition

Thakoon Addition

Thakoon Addition

Thakoon Addition

Thakoon Addition

Thakoon Addition

Victoria Beckham

Victoria Beckham

Victoria Beckham

Victoria Beckham

Victoria Beckham

Victoria Beckham

Yigal Azrouel

Yigal Azrouel

Yigal Azrouel

Yigal Azrouel

Yigal Azrouel

Yigal Azrouel

IMITATION OR INSPIRATION: VOL I

Another day, another example of Alexander Wang blatantly copying taking inspiration from other designers. This time, his evil eye of Sauron turns towards Balenciaga.

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Balenciaga, Pre-Fall 2009

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Alexander Wang, AW13

If you’re a fan of a furry hand, you can get these bad boys from Monki for £12. Lush.

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